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Autonomous Cars’ Effect on Auto, Cyber Insurance

Autonomous vehicles are expected to shake up the property/casualty market, as personal auto insurance premiums drop and cyber insurance steps in.As drivers look forward to a future of eating, reading and watching movies while being transported to destinations around town, insurers are grappling with big changes associated with the new technology.In...
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© By Denise Johnson | September 22, 2016 Claims Journal

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How to Get Teens to Take Dangers of Distracted Driving Seriously

How to Get Teens to Take Dangers of Distracted Driving Seriously
A program to educate teens about distracted driving—including a tour of a hospital trauma center and testimony from a trauma survivor—can increase awareness of the dangers of texting, cell phone use, and other distractions while driving, reports a study in the Journal of Trauma Nursing, the publication of the Society of Trauma Nurses.After going through the “Get the Message” program, teens say they will be less likely to text or make cell phone calls while driving, according to the study by Ruth Adeola, RN, MS, and colleagues at R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore.“Although teens are the least likely of any age group to engage in healthy driving behaviors, this study demonstrates the ability to influence teen knowledge and behavior positively,” the authors write. Increasing ‘Perceived Threat’  The study evaluated the effectiveness of the “Get the Message” program, designed to identify, define and measure the factors contributing to distracted driving in adolescents. About 900 teens were surveyed before and after completing the hospital-based injury prevention program.The program consisted of four sections, including: An introduction regarding the various types of distracted driving (visual, manual, and cognitive)—focusing on the unique risks faced by inexperienced teen drivers. A trauma center tour depicting the “journey” of an injured patient—from the hospital helipad, to the trauma resuscitation unit, to the intensive care units. A video depicting the physical, emotional, and mental trauma resulting from a motor vehicle crash due to distracted driving. A presentation by a survivor of a serious crash sustained as a teenager—emphasizing a sense of “connection and commonality” with the survivor, and the way the crash affected that person’s life. Before-and-after questionnaires from 900 teens indicated that the program increased awareness of the risks of distracted driving. For example, after the program, the teens were more likely to understand that texting while driving was as dangerous as driving while impaired. They were also more likely to understand the risks of other types of distractions, such as driving while talking on the phone.Participants also said they were more likely to follow healthy driving behaviors in the future. The percentage...
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